Flowers

Learn about the parts of a flower and different types of flowers.

TwoFlowers

Flower Activities

Flowers are all around the children, and they are excited to admire them, inhale their sweet aromas, arrange them in vases, and learn more about the different varieties. Here are a few ideas for you to try at home. 


Georgia Flowers Classified Cards ages 3 and up

Directions: Print and cut the flower classified cards for your child. Invite your child to admire them. Share the names of any flowers your child does not know.

Classified Cards with labels:

Georgia Flowers Classified Cards.pdf
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Classified Cards without labels:

Georgia Flowers Classified Cards without label.pdf
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Georgia Flowers 3 Part Cards ages 5 and up

Directions: Print and cut the three-part cards. Each Georgia flower will have a classified card, a printed slip, and a control card (depicting the classified card and its associated slip). Mix up the classified cards and slips. Use your knowledge of the Georgia flowers to match the slips to the correct picture. Check your work with the control card.

Georgia Flower 3 part cards.pdf
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Flower Scavenger Hunt ages 3 and up

Directions: Go outside and see how many different types of flowers you have in your backyard. Try to identify the flowers by matching them with the classified cards.

Spoken Language: Parts of a flower ages 3 and up 

Directions: Share the Introduction to the Parts of the Flower story with your child. In the classroom, we always introduce the parts of a flower using a real flower. The story shared includes azaleas from Ms. Myesha’s backyard. With older children, we label the parts using cursive slips, and you will see them in the story as well. Then, go outside, find a real flower, and identify the parts.

Coloring Activity 1 ages 3 to 3 ½

Directions: Use crayons to color the flower on coloring sheet 1. Use your imagination!

Flower Coloring Sheet 1.pdf
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Coloring Activity 2 ages 3 to 4 ½

Directions: Use crayons to color the flower templates on coloring sheet 2. This time begin by coloring the entire flower. Then color the individual parts you observed during the story. Use the control chart to see how you did!

Parts of a Flower Coloring Sheet.pdf
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Parts of a Flower Control Chart.pdf
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Writing Activity ages 4 ½ and up

Directions: Use colored pencils to fill in the individual parts you observed during the story on the Parts of a Flower Writing sheets. Label the parts using beautiful cursive writing. Use the control chart to check your work.

Parts of a Flower Writing Sheets.pdf
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Reading Activity ages 5 and up

Directions: Independently read the definitions for the flower and its parts. Color the flower template so that it matches the definition. Use the control chart to check your work. Then, cut out the definitions to make your own booklet.

Parts of a Flower Definitions.pdf
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Parts of a Flower- 3 Part Cards ages 5 and up

Directions: Print and cut the three-part cards. Each part of the flower will have a classified card, a printed slip, and a control card (depicting the classified card and its associated slip). Mix up the classified cards and slips. Use your knowledge of the parts of a flower to match the slips to the correct picture. Check your work with the control card.

Parts of a Flower 3 part cards.pdf
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Parts of a Flower- Definition Stages ages 5 ½ and up

Directions: Independently read the definitions for the Parts of the Flower. If desired, match the written description to the control card found in the 3 part card set. Next, cut out the red Parts of a Flower definition labels. Read the definition card that is missing the term. Choose the red slip that completes the definition for each part of the flower.

Parts of a Flower Definition Stage of Reading Classification.pdf
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Dissecting a Flower Activity ages 5 and up

Directions: Go outside and find a flower that has all of the parts (known as a complete flower). Gently take the flower apart and label the individual parts. Make a list of other flowers that have all of the parts. Make a note of any flowers that do not have all of the parts (known as an incomplete flower).

Dissection